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Industry Economic Accounts Information Guide

The Industry Economic Accounts at the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) prepare and publish a variety of economic statistics on industries. Specifically, they prepare the input-output accounts, the gross-domestic-product-by-industry accounts, and travel and tourism satellite accounts. As outlined below, the data are published in the Survey of Current Business (SCB) or other publications.

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Telephone and E-mail Contacts for Industry Economic Accounts Data Users

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I. Annual Industry Accounts

The annual industry accounts for the United States consist of the integrated gross-domestic-product (GDP)-by-industry and annual input-output (I-O) accounts. Beginning with 1998, the annual industry accounts provide time series of detailed, consistent information on the changing structure of the U.S. economy, including the annual contributions of private industries and government to the Nation’s GDP and the annual flow of goods and services used in the production processes of industries and going to the final uses that comprise GDP in BEA’s national income and product accounts (NIPAs).

Industries are defined according to the North American Industry Classification System of the United States (NAICS). Estimates are published for 61 private industries and for 4 government classifications and are available approximately 11 months after the end of the reference year. In addition, advance GDP-by-industry accounts estimates for 20 private industry groups and for 2 government classifications are published approximately 4 months after the end of the reference year.

A. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by Industry

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The GDP-by-industry accounts include estimates of value added by industry. Value added is a measure of the contribution of each private industry and of government to the Nation's GDP. It is defined as an industry's gross output (sales or receipts and other operating income, commodity taxes, and inventory change) minus its intermediate inputs(energy, raw materials, semi-finished goods, and purchased services). BEA publishes current-dollar estimates of an industry’s gross output and intermediate inputs, as well as the composition of its value added, which consists of compensation of employees, gross operating surplus, and taxes on production and imports, less subsidies. Chain-type price and quantity indexes of gross output, intermediate inputs, and value added are published by industry. Contributions to the percent change in real GDP are also published by industry group.

Uses of the accounts

The GDP-by-industry accounts can be used to examine changes in the structure of the U.S. economy and the importance of an industry and its contribution to GDP. Specifically, the estimates can be used

  • To identify changes in labor and capital shares
  • To study production, capacity, and productivity across industries
  • To compare price changes across the industries

2. Availability of data

a. Interactive tables

View or download specific data.

b. Data files

  • 1998-2012 NAICS Data:
    • GDPbyInd_VA_NAICS: Value Added by Industry, Gross Output by Industry, Intermediate Inputs by Industry, the Components of Value Added by Industry, and Employment by Industry: (XLS)
    • GDPbyInd_GO_NAICS: Gross Output by Industry in Current Dollars, Quantity Indexes by Industry, Price Indexes by Industry: (XLS)
    • GDPbyInd_SHIP_NAICS: Shipments by Industry in Current Dollars, Quantity Indexes by Industry, Price Indexes by Industry: (XLS)
    • GDPbyInd_KLEMS_NAICS: Industry estimates of energy, materials, and purchased-services inputs in current dollars and corresponding quantity and price indexes: (XLS)
  • Historical Data:
    NAICS Data:
    • Updated (12/13/2011) 1947-97 GDPbyInd_VA_NAICS: Full-Time and Part-Time Employees by Industry, 1948-97; Value Added by Industry in Current Dollars, Quantity Indexes by Industry, and Price Indexes by Industry, 1947-1997; Value Added by Industry, Gross Output by Industry, Intermediate Inputs by Industry, and the Components of Value Added by Industry, 1987-1997 (XLS)
  • SIC Data:
    • GDPbyInd_GO_SIC: GrossOutput by Industry in Current Dollars, Quantity Indexes by Industry, Price Indexes by Industry, 1977-1997 (XLS)
    • GDPbyInd_SHIP_SIC: Shipments by Industry in Current Dollars, Quantity Indexes by Industry, Price Indexes by Industry, 1977-1997 (XLS)
    • GDPbyInd_VA_SIC: Value Added by Industry, Gross Output by Industry, Intermediate Inputs by Industry, the Components of Value Added by Industry, and Employment by Industry, 1947-1997 (XLS)

3. Online articles and other documents

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles that were published in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA:

More recent articles

  • Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2011 (PDF)
    By Donald D. Kim, Teresa L. Gilmore, and William A. Jolliff
    Survey of Current Business, May 2012
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2003-2010 (PDF)
    By Teresa L. Gilmore, Amanda S. Lyndaker, Sarah J. Pack, and Simon Randrianarivel
    SCB, December 2011
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2010 (PDF)
    By Teresa L. Gilmore, Edward T. Morgan, and Sarah B. Osborne
    Survey of Current Business, May 2011
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2007–2009 (PDF)
    By Tameka R. L. Harris, William A. Jolliff, Amanda S. Lyndaker, and Matthew B. Schroeder
    Survey of Current Business, January 2011
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2009 and Revised Statistics for 1998–2008,
    Comprehensive Revision
    (PDF)
    By Matthew M. Donahoe, Edward T. Morgan, Kevin J. Muck, and Ricky L. Stewart
    Survey of Current Business, June 2010
  • Preview of the Comprehensive Revision of the Annual Industry Accounts (PDF)
    By Nicole M. Mayerhauser and Erich H. Strassner
    Survey of Current Business, March 2010
  • Experimental Quarterly U.S. Gross Domestic Product by Industry Statistics (PDF)
    By Carol A. Robbins, Thomas F. Howells, and Wendy Li
    Survey of Current Business, February 2010
  • "Annual Industry Accounts Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2008" (PDF)
    By Donald D. Kim, Brian M. Lindberg, and Justin M. Monaldo
    Survey of Current Business May 2009
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2005–2007" (PDF)
    By Soo Jeong Kim, Vincent A. Davis, Anna M. Jacobson, and Amanda S. Lyndaker
    Survey of Current Business December 2008
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2007" (PDF)
    By Brian M. Lindberg and Justin M. Monaldo Survey of Current Business May 2008
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2004–2006" (PDF)
    By Robert J. McCahill, Kevin B. Barefoot, and Robert J. Corea Survey of Current Business February 2008
  • "Integrating the 2002 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts and the 2002 Annual Industry Accounts" (PDF)
    By Dylan G. Rassier, Thomas F. Howells III, Edward T. Morgan, Nicholas R. Empey, and Conrad E. Roesch Survey of Current Business December 2007
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2006" (PDF)
    By Thomas F. Howells III and Kevin B. Barefoot Survey of Current Business May 2007
  • "Annual Industry Accounts:  Revised Estimates for 2003-2005" (PDF)
    By Thomas F. Howells III, Kevin B. Barefoot, and Brian M. Lindberg Survey of Current Business December 2006
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2005" (PDF)
    By Thomas F. Howells III and Kevin B. Barefoot Survey of Current Business May 2006
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Estimates for 2002-2004" (PDF)
    By George M. Smith and Sherlene K.S. Lum Survey of Current Business December 2005
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1947-86: New Estimates Based on the North American Industry Classification System" (PDF)
    By Robert E. Yuskavage and Mahnaz Fahim-Nader Survey of Current Business December 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Introducing KLEMS Input Estimates for 1997 – 2003" (PDF)
    By Erich Strassner, Gabriel W. Medeiros, and George M. Smith Survey of Current Business September 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2004" (PDF)
    By Erich H. Strassner and Thomas F. Howells III Survey of Current Business May 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Estimates for 2001-2003" (PDF)
    By George M. Smith, Matthew J. Gruenberg, Tameka R. L. Harris, and Erich H. Strassner Survey of Current Business January 2005
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1987-2000: New Estimates on the North American Industry Classification System" (PDF)
    By Robert E. Yuskavage and Yvon H. Pho Survey of Current Business November 2004
  • "Improved Annual Industry Accounts for 1998-2003: Integrated Annual Input-Output Accounts and Gross-Domestic-Product-by-Industry Accounts" (PDF)
    By Brian C. Moyer, Mark A. Planting, Paul V. Kern, and Abigail M. Kish Survey of Current Business June 2004
  • "Preview of the Comprehensive Revision of the Annual Industry Accounts: Integrating the Annual Input-Output Accounts and Gross-Domestic-Product-by-Industry Accounts" (PDF)
    By Brian C. Moyer, Mark A. Planting, Mahnaz Fahim-Nader, and Sherlene K. S. Lum Survey of Current Business March 2004

Other articles and documents

  • A Primer on BEA’s Industry Accounts (PDF)
    By Mary L. Streitwieser, May 2011
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 2002" (PDF)
    By Robert E. Yuskavage and Erich H. Strassner Survey of Current Business May 2003
  • "A Computational Routine for Disaggregating Industry Margin Data to Estimate Product Margin Rates" (PDF)
    By Matthew Atkinson. Paper presented at the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology Research Conference, Fall 2003, Washington, D.C.
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1999-2001" (PDF)
    By Robert J. McCahill and Brian C. Moyer Survey of Current Business November 2002
  • "An Analysis of the Composition of Intermediate Inputs by Industry" (PDF)
    By Erich Strassner and Brian C. Moyer. Paper presented at the 14th International Conference on Input-Output Techniques, October 10-15, 2002, Montreal, Canada
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry: A Progress Report on Accelerated Estimates" (PDF)
    By Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business June 2002
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1998-2000" (PDF)
    By Sherlene K.S. Lum and Brian C. Moyer Survey of Current Business November 2001
  • "Gross Domestic Product by Industry for 1997-99" (PDF)
    By Sherlene K.S. Lum and Brian C. Moyer Survey of Current Business December 2000
  • Priorities for Industry Accounts
    By Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business November 2000
  • "Improved Estimates of Gross Product by Industry for 1947-98"
    By Sherlene K.S. Lum, Brian C. Moyer, and Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business June 2000
  • "Gross Product by Industry, 1995-97"
    By Sherlene K.S. Lum and Brian C. Moyer Survey of Current Business November 1998
  • "Gross Product by Industry Price Measures, 1977-96"
    By Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business March 1998
  • "Gross Product by Industry, 1947-96"
    By Sherlene K.S. Lum and Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business November 1997
  • "Note on Alternative Measures of Gross Product by Industry"
    By Robert P. Parker Survey of Current Business November 1997
  • "Improved Estimates of Gross Product by Industry, 1959-94"
    By Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business August 1996

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B. Annual Input-Output (I-O) Accounts

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The annual input-output (I-O) accounts provide a time series of detailed, consistent information on the flow of goods and services that make up the production processes of industries. For each year beginning with 1998, the accounts show how industries interact as they provide inputs to, and use outputs from, each other to produce GDP.

The I-O accounts are presented in standard make and use tables and several supplementary tables, which consist of modified standard make and use tables and four requirements tables.

The standard tables include a make table and a use table. The make table shows the commodities that are produced by each industry. The use table shows the inputs to industry production and the commodities that are consumed by final users.

The supplementary make and use tables are modified standard make and use tables. The modifications, or redefinitions, consist of moving the outputs and inputs of some secondary production activities between industries. Redefinitions, which are necessary for the derivation of the requirements tables, are made in cases where the production process for the secondary product is very dissimilar to that for the industry’s primary product. For example, the production process for restaurant services provided in hotels is very different from that of lodging services. Therefore, for the supplementary tables, the output and inputs for these restaurant services are moved or redefined from the hotel industry to the restaurant industry.

The requirements tables are derived from the supplementary make and the use tables. The direct requirements table shows the amount of a commodity that is required by an industry to produce a dollar of the industry's output. The total requirements tables show the production that is required, directly and indirectly, from each industry and each commodity to deliver a dollar of a commodity to final users.

Uses of the accounts

The annual I-O accounts can be used to study changes in structure of the U.S. economy and the relative importance of an industry to all other industries. The accounts are an important tool for analysis because they show the production functions of individual industries and the interactions among producers and between producers and final users in the economy. Specifically, these accounts can be used

  • To study production capacity and productivity across industries
  • To examine the direct and indirect effects of changes in final uses on industries and commodities; for example, to estimate the effects of a strike or a natural disaster on the economy, or, supplemented with additional information, to estimate the effects of an increase in U.S. exports on employment

2. Availability of data

a. Interactive tables

View or download specific data.

b. Data files

  • 1998-2011 Summary Make Annual I-O Table Before Redefinitions
    Contains the 1998-2011 make table before redefinitions on a 2002 NAICS basis: (XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Summary Use Annual I-O Table Before Redefinitions
    Contains the 1998-2011 use table before redefinitions on a 2002 NAICS basis: (XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Supplementary Make Table After Redefinitions at the Summary Level
    Contains the 1998-2011 redefined make table. Estimates for all years were prepared with methodologies that are unique to the integrated annual industry accounts and are for industries defined according to the 2002 North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and adjusted for redefinitions of secondary output: (XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Supplementary Use Table After Redefinitions at the Summary Level
    Contains the 1998-2011 redefined use table. Estimates for all years were prepared with methodologies that are unique to the integrated annual industry accounts and are for industries defined according to the 2002 North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and adjusted for redefinitions of secondary output: (XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Supplementary Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements Table After Redefinitions at the Summary Level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each commodity that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the commodity to final users:(XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Supplementary Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements Table After Redefinitions at the Summary Level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each industry that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the commodity to final users:(XLS)
  • 1998-2011 Supplementary Industry-by-Industry Total Requirements Table After Redefinitions at the Summary Level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each industry that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the industry output to final users:(XLS)
  • Historical SIC Data

3. Online articles and other documents

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles that were published in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA:

More recent articles

  • Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2011 (PDF)
    By Donald D. Kim, Teresa L. Gilmore, and William A. Jolliff
    Survey of Current Business, May 2012
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2003-2010 (PDF)
    By Teresa L. Gilmore, Amanda S. Lyndaker, Sarah J. Pack, and Simon Randrianarivel
    SCB, December 2011
  • Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2010 (PDF)
    By Teresa L. Gilmore, Edward T. Morgan, and Sarah B. Osborne
    Survey of Current Business, May 2011
  • Preview of the Comprehensive Revision of the Annual Industry Accounts (PDF)
    By Nicole M. Mayerhauser and Erich H. Strassner
    Survey of Current Business, March 2010
  • Experimental Quarterly U.S. Gross Domestic Product by Industry Statistics (PDF)
    By Carol A. Robbins, Thomas F. Howells, and Wendy Li
    Survey of Current Business, February 2010
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2005–2007" (PDF - KB)
    By Soo Jeong Kim, Vincent A. Davis, Anna M. Jacobson, and Amanda S. Lyndaker
    Survey of Current Business December 2008
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Statistics on GDP by Industry for 2007" (PDF - KB)
    By Brian M. Lindberg and Justin M. Monaldo Survey of Current Business May 2008
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Statistics for 2004–2006" (PDF - KB)
    By Robert J. McCahill, Kevin B. Barefoot, and Robert J. Corea Survey of Current Business February 2008
  • "Integrating the 2002 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts and the 2002 Annual Industry Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Dylan G. Rassier, Thomas F. Howells III, Edward T. Morgan, Nicholas R. Empey, and Conrad E. Roesch Survey of Current Business December 2007
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2006" (PDF - KB)
    By Thomas F. Howells III and Kevin B. Barefoot Survey of Current Business May 2007
  • "Annual Industry Accounts:  Revised Estimates for 2003-2005" (PDF - KB)
    By Thomas F. Howells III, Kevin B. Barefoot, and Brian M. Lindberg Survey of Current Business December 2006
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2005" (PDF - KB)
    By Thomas F. Howells III and Kevin B. Barefoot Survey of Current Business May 2006
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Estimates for 2002-2004" (PDF - KB)
    By George M. Smith and Sherlene K.S. Lum Survey of Current Business December 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Introducing KLEMS Input Estimates for 1997 – 2003" (PDF - KB)
    By Erich Strassner, Gabriel W. Medeiros, and George M. Smith Survey of Current Business September 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Advance Estimates for 2004" (PDF - KB)
    By Erich H. Strassner and Thomas F. Howells III Survey of Current Business May 2005
  • "Annual Industry Accounts: Revised Estimates for 2001-2003" (PDF - KB)
    By George M. Smith, Matthew J. Gruenberg, Tameka R. L. Harris, and Erich H. Strassner Survey of Current Business January 2005
  • "Improved Annual Industry Accounts for 1998-2003: Integrated Annual Input-Output Accounts and Gross-Domestic-Product-by-Industry Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Brian C. Moyer, Mark A. Planting, Paul V. Kern, Abigail M. Kish Survey of Current Business June 2004
  • "Preview of the Comprehensive Revision of the Annual Industry Accounts: Integrating the Annual Input-Output Accounts and Gross-Domestic-Product-by-Industry Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Brian C. Moyer, Mark A. Planting, Mahnaz Fahim-Nader, Sherlene K. S. Lum Survey of Current Business March 2004

Other articles and documents

  • "Increasing the Timeliness of U.S. Annual I-O Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Mark A. Planting and Jiemin Guo. Paper presented at the 14th International Conference on Input-Output Techniques, October 10-15, 2002, Montreal, Canada, and the International Regional Science Annual Meeting, November 2001, Charleston, SC
  • "Annual Input-Output Accounts of the U.S. Economy, 1998" (PDF - KB)
    By Mark A. Planting and Peter D. Kuhbach Survey of Current Business December 2001
  • "Annual Input-Output Accounts of the U.S. Economy, 1997" (PDF - KB)
    By Peter D. Kuhbach and Mark A. Planting Survey of Current Business January 2001
  • Priorities for Industry Accounts
    By Robert E. Yuskavage Survey of Current Business November 2000
  • "Annual Input-Output Accounts of the U.S. Economy, 1996"
    By Ann M. Lawson, Sumiye Okubo, and Mark A. Planting Survey of Current Business January 2000

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II. Benchmark Input-Output Accounts

A. Benchmark Input-Output (I-O)

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The Industry Economic Accounts (IEA) prepares benchmark input-output (I-O) accounts for years ending in 2 and 7, which are based on detailed data from the quinquennial economic censuses that are conducted by the Bureau of the Census. They are published at the summary level and at the detailed level.

The benchmark accounts show how industries interact at the detailed level; specifically, they show how approximately 500 industries provide input to, and use output from, each other to produce gross domestic product. These accounts provide detailed information on the flows of the goods and services that make up the production processes of industries.

The 2002 Benchmark I-O Accounts Tables

The 2002 benchmark I-O accounts are presented in the standard make and use tables and several supplementary tables. The supplementary tables consist of make and use tables that are based on the standard tables, four requirements tables, and bridge tables.

Standard tables

The standard make and use tables are based on NAICS. They are constructed before the redefinitions of selected secondary products. These standard tables provide data in a way that is consistent with the GDP-by-industry accounts and the gross state product accounts and with other industry data that are based on information collected on the NAICS basis.

The make table shows the commodities that are produced by each industry. The use table shows the inputs to industry production and the commodities that are consumed by final users.

Supplementary tables

The supplementary make and use tables are based on the standard make and use tables. They are constructed after the redefinitions of selected secondary products. The estimates in the supplementary make and use tables are used to calculate four requirements tables--commodity-by-industry direct requirements, commodity-by-commodity total requirements, industry-by-commodity total requirements, and industry-by-industry total requirements--that quantify the direct and indirect effects of changes in final demand on the economy.

The direct requirements table shows the amount of a commodity that is required by an industry to produce a dollar of the industry's output. The three total requirements tables show the production that is required, directly and indirectly, from each industry and each commodity to deliver a dollar of a commodity to final users.

These requirements tables are an important analytical tool because they show the interdependence among the producers and consumers in the economy. Using these tables, analysts can estimate the direct and indirect effects of changes in final uses on industries and commodities. For example, these tables can be used to determine the economic impact of a disaster or to compute the effect on output of a shift in demand from domestic to imported goods.

Three additional supplementary tables serve as bridges between the I-O estimates and estimates in the NIPAs. The first bridge table covers the I-O commodity composition of NIPA personal consumption expenditures. The second table covers the I-O commodity composition of NIPA private equipment and software expenditures. The third table reconciles the I-O estimates of exports and imports with those in the NIPAs.

For more information on standard and supplementary tables see “Technical Note” and the box “Treatment of Secondary Products” in "Benchmark Input-Output Accounts of the United States 1997," (PDF - KB) Survey of Current Business, December 2002.

Uses of the accounts

The benchmark I-O accounts can be used to study changes in structure of the U.S. economy or as a framework for preparing other economic statistics. The accounts are an important tool for analysis because they show the detailed production functions of individual industries and the interactions among producers and between producers and final users in the economy. Specifically, these accounts can be used:

  • To estimate the direct and indirect effects of changes in final uses on industries and commodities; for example, to estimate the effects of a strike or a natural disaster on the economy, or, supplemented with additional information, to estimate the effects of an increase in U.S. exports on employment
  • To provide detail that is essential in determining weights for price indexes, such as the producer price index that is compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and quantity indexes, such as the quantity index for gross domestic product by industry compiled by Industry Economic Accounts (IEA)
  • To provide the basis for benchmarking the NIPAs every 5 years
  • To provide a framework and data for the preparation of other economic statistics, such as the transportation satellite accounts and the travel and tourism satellite accounts, both of which are prepared by Industry Economic Accounts (IEA)

2. Availability of data

a. Interactive tables

View or download specific data.

b. Data files

Note: The 2002 benchmark files available on this page reflect the revisions made in April 2008. The 1992, 1987, and 1982 benchmark files available on this page do not reflect the 1999 comprehensive revision of the NIPAs. In addition, the 1997 benchmark files do not reflect the 2003 comprehensive revision of the NIPAs.

The benchmark I-O data products previously available on diskettes are now also available in downloadable compressed (self-extracting ZIP format) ASCII files. (Opening Zipped Files Instructions)

  • 2002 Standard Make and Use Tables at the detailed level
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Standard Make and Use Tables at the summary level
    (XLS - KB)
  • 2002 Standard Make and Use Tables at the sector level
    (XLS - KB)
  • 2002 Supplementary Make, Use and Direct Requirements Tables at the detailed level
    Contains the supplementary make, use and direct requirements tables after redefinitions:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Summary Tables
    Contains the supplementary make, use, direct requirements coefficients, commodity-by-commodity total requirements, industry-by-commodity total requirements, and industry-by-industry total requirements tables, after redefinitions at the sector and summary levels:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Supplementary Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements after redefinitions at the detailed level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each commodity that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the commodity to final users:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Supplementary Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements after redefinitions at the detailed level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each industry that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the commodity to final users:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Supplementary Industry-by-Industry Total Requirements after redefinition at the detailed level
    Contains estimates of the inputs for each industry that are directly and indirectly required to deliver a dollar of the industry output to final users:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 2002 Bridge tables to Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) and Private Fixed Investment in Equipment and Software (PES)
    Contains the input-output commodity composition at the detailed and summary level for personal consumption expenditures and private fixed investment in equipment and software expenditure categories from the national income and product accounts valued at producers' prices and purchasers' prices:
    (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • Detailed Item Output from the 2002 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts
    The table shows the detailed items and their corresponding output values from the 2002 benchmark input-output (I-O) accounts, that, when aggregated, equal commodity output. It is a supplementary table to the 2002 benchmark I-O accounts:
    (XLS - KB)
  • Import Matrix from the 2002 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts
    The import-matrix is a supplementary table to the 2002 benchmark input-output accounts. For each commodity, the import-matrix table shows the value of import of that same commodity used by each industry:
    (XLS - KB)
  • Concordance between 2002 Input-Output Commodity Codes and Foreign Trade Harmonized Codes
    The table links Census merchandise trade data by harmonized foreign trade codes to I-O commodity codes by weight. The weight indicates what portion of the harmonized code value was allocated to the I-O commodity:
    (XLS - KB )
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Summary Tables
    NDN-0305 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Standard Make and Use Tables at the detailed level
    NDN-0306 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Supplementary Make, Use and Direct Requirements Tables at the detailed level
    NDN-0307 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Supplementary Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements Table at the detailed level
    NDN-0309 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Supplementary Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements Table at the detailed level
    NDN-0308 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Supplementary Industry-by-Industry Total Requirements Table at the detailed level
    NDN-0310 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1997 Benchmark I-O Bridge tables to Personal Consumption Expenditures and Private Fixed Investment in Equipment and Software
    NDN-0311 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • Detailed Item Output fromthe 1997 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts (XLS - KB)
  • Import Matrix from the 1997 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts (XLS - KB)
  • Concordance between 1997 Input-Output Commodity Codes and Foreign Trade Harmonized Codes
    NDN-0317 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Table Six-Digit Transactions
    NDN-0178 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O SIC-Based Table Six-Digit Transactions
    NDN-0179 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Table Two-Digit
    NDN-0180 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0183 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0184 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Composition of NIPA Final Demand
    NDN-0185 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Benchmark I-O Bridge Tables to PCE and PDE
    NDN-0186 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Table Six-Digit Transactions
    NDN-0016 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0017 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0018 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Table Two-Digit Make and Use
    NDN-0019 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Composition of NIPA Final Demand
    NDN-0020 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1987 Benchmark I-O Bridge Tables to PCE and PDE
    NDN-0021 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1982 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Transactions
    NDN-0025 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1982 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Industry-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0026 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1982 Benchmark I-O Two-Digit
    NDN-0125 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1982 Benchmark I-O Six-Digit Commodity-by-Commodity Total Requirements
    NDN-0127 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • Historical SIC Data

3. Online articles and other documents

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles that were published either in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA, or in separate documents:

More recent articles and documents

  • "Integrating the 2002 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts and the 2002 Annual Industry Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Dylan G. Rassier, Thomas F. Howells III, Edward T. Morgan, Nicholas R. Empey, and Conrad E. Roesch  Survey of Current Business December 2007
  • "U.S. Benchmark Input-Output Accounts, 2002" (PDF - KB)
    By Ricky L. Stewart, Jessica Brede Stone, and Mary L. Streitwieser October 2007
  • "Concepts and Methods of the U.S. Input-Output Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Karen J. Horowitz and Mark A. Planting  September 2006
  • "Preview of the Benchmark Input-Output Accounts for 2002: Preliminary Estimates of Gross Output, Proposed Classification Framework" (PDF - KB)
    By Karla L. Stanley-Allen, Nicholas R. Empey, Douglas S. Meade, Stanislaw J. Rzeznik, Mary L. Streitwieser, and Monica S. Strople Survey of Current Business September 2005
  • "Preview of the Revised NIPA Estimates for 1997: Effects of Incorporating the 1997 Benchmark I-O Accounts and Proposed Definitional and Statistical Changes" (PDF - KB)
    By Stephanie H. McCulla and Carol E. Moylan Survey of Current Business January 2003
  • "Benchmark Input-Output Accounts of the United States 1997" (PDF - KB)
    By Ann M. Lawson, Kurt S. Bersani, Mahnaz Fahim-Nader, and Jiemin Guo Survey of Current Business December 2002

Other articles and documents

  • "From Make-Use to Symmetric I-O Tables: An Assessment of Alternative Technology Assumptions" (PDF - KB)
    By Jiemin Guo, Ann M. Lawson, and Mark A. Planting. Paper presented at the 14th International Conference on Input-Output Techniques, October 10-15, 2002, Montreal, Canada
  • "A Preview of the 1997 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts: New Detailed and Summary Industries" (PDF - KB)
    By Ann M. Lawson and Karen J. Horowitz Survey of Current Business August 2002
  • "Upcoming Changes in the NAICS-Based 1997 Benchmark Input-Output Accounts" (PDF - KB)
    By Karen J. Horowitz and Stephanie H. McCulla Survey of Current Business December 2001
  • "Benchmark Input-Output Accounts for the U.S. Economy, 1992: Requirements Tables"
    By Ann M. Lawson Survey of Current Business December 1997
  • "Benchmark Input-Output Accounts for the U.S. Economy, 1992: Make, Use, and Supplementary Tables"
    By Ann M. Lawson Survey of Current Business November 1997
  • "Benchmark Input-Output Accounts for the U.S. Economy, 1987" (PDF - KB)
    By Ann M. Lawson and D.A. Teske Survey of Current Business April 1994
  • The text of the publication Benchmark Input- Output Accounts of the United States, 1992 (PDF - KB)

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B. Capital Flow

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The capital flow table shows the destination of the new capital investment in equipment, software, and structures by the industries that purchase or lease these capital goods and services. The use table from the benchmark I-O accounts shows the materials and services input requirements for each industry. The capital flow table shows the structure of flows of new capital goods and services for each industry.

The 1997 capital flow table is the seventh in a series of tables that BEA has produced. The earlier tables supplemented the benchmark I-O accounts for 1963, 1967, 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1992. The 1997 capital flow table provides the most detailed view of investment by commodity and by using industry, showing flows of 180 commodities to 123 private sector industries.

The following major changes have been introduced in the 1997 capital flow table:

  • The data are now presented on the basis of the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
  • More detail is now available in the services industries and the information sector (NAICS 51) that represent a large and growing market for information technology and other high-tech capital.
  • The table now includes software investment, a change that was adopted in the NIPAs in 1999 and that was incorporated into the 1997 benchmark I-O accounts.

Uses of the accounts

The capital flow table enables many types of analysis that are not possible using only the I-O table. Among these are:

  • The market analysis for capital goods
  • The examination of the effects of information technology investment on productivity
  • The development of capital stocks by industry using asset-specific depreciation estimates

2. Availability of data

* The estimates provided in these files are not official; they are considered somewhat less reliable than other estimates, but they are made available for research purposes.

3. Online articles

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles that were published in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA:

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III. Satellite Industry Accounts

A. U.S. Research and Development Satellite Account

1. Overview and uses

Overview

Satellite accounts are supplementary estimates that do not change the official national accounts, including gross domestic product (GDP). These satellite accounts provide greater detail than in the national income and product accounts (NIPAs) and allow analysis of a particular aspect of the economy, such as investment in research and development (R&D).

The U.S. R&D Satellite Account (R&DSA) adjusts the accounting conventions of BEA’s core accounts to test the impact of changing the scope of investment—in this case, recognizing R&D as an intangible asset. It provides estimates of R&D investment, capital stock, and depreciation in the economy on a funder basis. In addition, it reports R&D adjusted measures of GDP, gross domestic income, and national savings. While this satellite account does not affect BEA’s official measures of GDP, it provides an opportunity to work out new methodologies that may be incorporated into the accounts in the future.

The account is developed by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, with support from the National Science Foundation. The research lays the ground work for incorporating R&D as an asset into the NIPAs, a proposal currently under consideration for the internationally accepted standard for national accounts, the System of National Accounts.

Uses of the accounts

The R&DSA provides data on the funding of R&D in the U.S. economy and its impact on the NIPAs. Specifically, the account can be used:

  • To determine the funding distribution of R&D investment
  • To assess the effects of R&D on the U.S. economy

2. Availability of data

  • 1959-2004 R&D data (XLS - KB)

3. Online articles and other documents

"Research and Development Satellite Account Update. Estimates for 1959-2004: New Estimates for Industry, Regional, and International Accounts" (PDF - KB), Tables (PDF - KB)
By Carol A. Robbins and Carol E. Moylan   Survey of Current Business   October 2007

"BEA’s 2006 Research and Development Satellite Account: Preliminary Estimates for 1959-2002; Effect on GDP and Other Measures" (PDF - KB), Tables (PDF - KB)
By Sumiye Okubo, Carol A. Robbins, Carol E. Moylan, Brian K. Sliker, Laura I. Schultz, and Lisa S. Mataloni   Survey of Current Business   December 2006

B. U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts (TTSAs) are based on the detailed 1997 benchmark I-O accounts and are consistent with the integrated annual industry accounts. The methods that are used to prepare the TTSAs are also consistent with the methods used to estimate gross domestic product, national income, and other national economic measures. These accounts are developed by the Bureau, with the support of the Tourism Industries Office of the International Trade Administration, in order to more accurately measure the contribution of travel and tourism to the economy.

The TTSAs present a detailed picture of travel and tourism activity and its role in the U.S. economy. These accounts present estimates of expenditures by tourists, or visitors, on 24 types of goods and services. The accounts also present estimates of the income generated by travel and tourism and estimates of output and employment generated by travel and tourism-related industries.

The accounts are updated annually and have been expanded to provide quarterly estimates of the sales of goods and services to travelers and employment attributable to those tourism sales.

Uses of the accounts

The TTSAs can be used to determine the size of tourism and the components of travel and tourism. Specifically, these accounts can be used

  • To determine the shares of the goods and services that were sold to visitors and the shares that were sold to local residents
  • To assess the effects of travel and tourism on the U.S. economy
  • To examine the relationship among the travel and tourism industries
  • To determine the expenditures of tourists
  • To compare travel and tourism industries to other manufacturing and services industries

2. Availability of data

In order to provide more timely information, the accounts have been expanded to provide quarterly estimates of the sales of goods and services to travelers and employment attributable to those tourism sales. (These estimates are based on the estimates of personal consumption expenditures from the national income and product accounts.)

a. The latest estimates are released via a quarterly news release. The most recent news release is available at:

b. In addition, the annual 1998-2012 estimates are available in downloadable compressed files. (Opening Zipped Files Instructions)

  • Annual estimates, 1998-2012 (EXE) (ZIP)

3. Online articles

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles that were published in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA:

  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2010–2013” (PDF)
    By Steven L. Zemanek   Survey of Current Business  June 2014
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2009–2012” (PDF)
    By Steven L. Zemanek   Survey of Current Business  June 2013
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2003–2011” (PDF)
    By Steven L. Zemanek   Survey of Current Business  June 2012
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2007–2010” (PDF)
    By Steven L. Zemanek   Survey of Current Business  June 2011
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2004–2009” (PDF)
    By By Steven L. Zemanek and Stanislaw J. Rzeznik   Survey of Current Business  November 2010
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2005–2008” (PDF - KB | Tables - KB)
    By Eric S. Griffith and Steven L. Zemanek   Survey of Current Business  June 2009
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2004–2007” (PDF - KB)
    By Sarah R. Mattingly and Eric S. Griffith   Survey of Current Business  June 2008
  • “U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 1998–2006” (PDF - KB)
    By Paul V. Kern and Edward A. Kocis   Survey of Current Business  June 2007
  • “A Proposal To Include Motor Vehicle Services in the U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts” (PDF - KB)
    By Sumiye Okubo, Barbara M. Fraumeni, and Mahnaz Fahim-Nader   Survey of Current Business   June 2007
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2002-2005" (PDF - KB)
    By Peter D. Kuhbach and Bradlee A. Herauf   Survey of Current Business   June 2006
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 2001-2004" (PDF - KB)
    By Peter D. Kuhbach and Bradlee A. Herauf Survey of Current Business June 2005
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 1998-2003" (PDF - KB)
    By Peter D. Kuhbach, Mark A. Planting, and Erich H. Strassner Survey of Current Business September 2004
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 1996 and 1997" (PDF - KB)
    By David Kass and Sumiye Okubo Survey of Current Business July 2000
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts for 1992"
    By Sumiye Okubo and Mark A. Planting Survey of Current Business July 1998

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C. U.S. Transportation Satellite Accounts

1. Overview and uses

Overview

The U.S. transportation satellite accounts (TSAs) show a detailed picture of transportation services and their role in the U.S. economy. These accounts were jointly developed by the Industry Economic Accounts (IEA) and by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics in the U.S. Department of Transportation in order to more accurately measure the contribution of transportation activities to the U.S. economy.

These accounts present estimates of both transportation services that are hired and transportation services that a firm provides for its own use (own account). The estimates are presented in dollars rather than in the more usual physical units.

The TSAs consist of four tables--a make table, a use table, a direct requirements table, and a total requirements table. These tables are based on the input-output tables, but they have been expanded to include own-account transportation services as a commodity and as an industry.

The make table shows the commodities that are produced by each industry. The use table shows the factors of that production--the commodities, or intermediate inputs, and the labor and capital, or value added--and the commodities that are consumed by final users. The direct requirements table shows the amount of a commodity that is required by an industry to produce a dollar of the industry's output. The total requirements table shows the production that is required, directly and indirectly, from each industry to deliver a dollar of a commodity to final users.

Uses of the accounts

The TSAs can be used to determine the size of the transportation activities in the U.S. economy and the contribution of transportation to gross output and gross domestic product. Specifically, the accounts can be used

  • To identify the industries that account for the most transportation activities
  • To estimate the proportion of services that are hired and that are provided by firms (own-account services)
  • To identify the industries that are the biggest users of transportation services
  • To estimate the share of transportation services in the production costs of these industries
  • To estimate the shares of government spending and business spending for transportation-related structures and equipment, such as highways and trucks

2. Availability of data

The TSAs data products previously available on diskettes are now also available in downloadable compressed (self-extracting ZIP format) ASCII files. (Opening Zipped Files Instructions)

  • 1996 Transportation Satellite Accounts , NDN-0252 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Transportation Satellite Accounts Summary Two-Digit, NDN-0193 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Transportation Satellite Accounts Input Structure Six-Digit, NDN-0194 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)
  • 1992 Transportation Satellite Accounts Industry-by-Commodity Six-Digit, NDN-0195 (EXE - KB) (ZIP - KB)

3. Online articles

For detailed information and analysis, see the following articles published in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly journal of BEA:

TELEPHONE AND E-MAIL CONTACTS FOR DATA USERS - Industry Economic Accounts

Benchmark Input-Output:

(202) 606-5585

industryeconomicaccounts@bea.gov

Capital Flow:

(202) 606-5585

industryeconomicaccounts@bea.gov

Current Industry Accounts:

(202) 606-5307

industryeconomicaccounts@bea.gov

R&D Satellite Account:

(202) 606-9923

researchanddevelopment@bea.gov

Travel and Tourism Satellite Accounts:

(202) 606-5587

travelandtourism@bea.gov

Transportation Satellite Accounts:

(202) 606-5587

industryeconomicaccounts@bea.gov

BEA Public Information Office: (202) 606-9900